Involuntary IT managers costing SMBs billions in productivity

By VAR_Staffing
In Channel
May 1, 2013
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VAR_Staffing / VAR Staffing

No one wants to find themselves in charge of something they know little about. While it sounds like the plot of a bad sitcom, when it comes to managing technology, it is in fact happening in businesses across the country and it is costing companies billions.

Known as the involuntary IT manager (IITM), this situation arises when companies, instead of having a dedicated internal IT staff, just have the most tech-savvy employees handle IT questions on top of their daily responsibilities. With the way technology is driving the business world, this sounds like a bad idea. Not surprisingly, it is.

A new Microsoft/AMI-Partners study found that small businesses are losing $24 billion in productivity each year because of IITMs. The issues arise when employees are forced to ignore regular responsibilities to instead handle IT problems. The study estimates that IITMs lose six hours per week or about 300 hours per year performing IT responsibilities not central to their job specs.

However, this is making more IT Principals turn toward VARs and MSPS in order to handle a number of different tech challenges. A recent CRN article interviewed John Motazedi, the president of a solution provider, who said he has been struggling to convince small businesses that it is more effective to use outside support instead of using IITMs​.

"The [end user's] business should focus on what the business does well. I don't practice medicine on my own. We have that challenge all the time," Motazedi said. "They don't realize what they absolutely need until they're so deep into it, when a simple fix by a professional would have saved tons of hours and money and time and productivity."

While more businesses turn toward solution providers to get by, those VARs and MSPs need to make sure they have the impactful talent that their clients demand. By partnering with VAR Staffing, Solution Providers can separate themselves from the competition.

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